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20121006
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, a provider of multimediwspa ne dul tidia news and information services worldwide. be more, pbs. tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with actor turned travel writer andrew mccarthy. the former star is out with a book detailing his travels around the globe the text is called "the longest way home." in his role at editor at large for national geographic traveler, we are glad you have joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome andrew mccarthy to this program. he is now an award winning travel writer that serves as an editor at large for national geographic travel. the his critically acclaimed book is called "along the way home.
. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: sheila bair is the former chair of the fdic. her efforts to take on wall street excess and stand up for average americans is the subject of the new text "bull by the horns." good to have you on this program. >> thank you for having me. tavis: let me start with the news of this week. everybody knows in 48 hours, for the first time, mitt romney and mr. obama will come face to face in a debate. if you were jim wednesday night, where these issues are concerned, at the economy, how we avoid what has happened already, how we avoid falling into another recession, around those issues, what ought to be debated wednesday night? >> they should be challenged about whether we want a sustainable financial system. will both presidents appoint people to their economic team who will see the economic interest of the people probably? -- broadly? will they appoint regulators who will be independent of wall street? will they support them when they need to make decisions? will this president protect regulators when congress tries to beat
. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: i am pleased to welcome anmal rty back to this program. she has written a funny memoir about her life and career entitled "my mother was nouts." at herake up look back lifey in jail. >> it very, very good. -- about her life in film. >> there are no holes. thanks. ♪ >> are you crying? >> no. >> are you crying? are you crying? there is no crying. there is no crying in baseball. ♪ tavis: you look at one of the episodes of laverne and shirley, the bowling ball episode, and you knew that was the second episode. how do you recall that? >> i have a strange memory. i remember every piece of film. before they did the clacker, he did a thing we could use, or somebody. i know what i shot. i don't remember what got eight or anything about last week, it was a little hectic, but i remember back in my childhood. i remember professionally, and i remember what i shot. tavis: i don't know how you recall that with episode no. 2. speaking of your childhood, why did you pick that title? >> everyone feels their mother is slightly nuts
. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: ari berman is a political correspondent for "the nation" and author of the book "herding donkeys." last year he wrote a piece called "the gop war on voting." much of what he wrote has come to fruition. he joins us from new york. good to have you on this program. >> i am a longtime admirer. thanks for having me. tavis: honored to have you on. let me talk about this piece you wrote for "rolling stone." i don't want people to think we are demonizing or casting aspersions on the gop, but i want you to lay out the facts. is it the case that most of this push, these strict voter i.d. laws, this is being pushed almost exclusively by republicans, yes or no? >> there are issues where democrats and republicans are at fault, where they are both to blame. this is not one of these issues. this is an issue that since the 2010 elections, laws that restrict the right to vote have been passed overwhelmingly by republicans in states with republican legislatures and republican government. that includes efforts to crack down on v
. woodruff: t >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: carnegie corp >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: more jobs, less unemployment. the september numbers offered the latest look into the u.s. economy, and the latest fuel for the fight over economic policy in the presidential campaign. it was the kind of news that president obama hoped for, just over a month before the election and two days after a sub-par debate outing. >> more americans entered the work force, more people are getting jobs. >> brown: indeed, september's unemployment rate, calculated by a survey of households, fell to 7.8%. that's the lowest since the president took office. a second survey, of businesses, showed that employers added a net of 114,000 jobs, and job gains for july and august were revised upward by 86,000 the president touted the numbers
astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: three months after upholding president obama's health care law, the supreme court is back with a docket that may even rival last year's term for drama. the justices will decide a case on affirmative action in higher education, and are expected to take up disputes on same-sex marriage, civil rights law, and more. the term opened today with arguments in another controversial case: whether businesses can be sued in u.s. courts for human rights violations that occur in foreign countries. marcia coyle of the "national law journal" was in the courtroom this morning, and is back with us tonight. welcome back. >> nice to be back. brown: let us stipulate, as the lawyers say, th
's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf and carnegie corporation. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: with less than a week left before the first presidential debate, both candidates remained focused today on persuading voters they can boost the economy. but a key question at the heart of it all-- is the economy slowing, stalling, or perhaps even gaining strength in some ways? new data are sending conflicting signs. republican presidential nominee mitt romney campaigned today at a military academy in pennsylvania. romney promised better jobs for young people like the cadets sitting behind him and a better future for the entire country. >> we're in a very different road than what i think the people of the world expected from the united states of america. and if i'm elected president of this country, i will get us back on
of the detroit tigers. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the first presidential debate is behind them, but the two sides went at it again today. republicans said their man took it to the president in the denver duel. the obama camp charged the truth got trampled in the process. >> la night i thought was a great opportunity for the american people to see two very different visions for the country. and -- (applause) -- and i think it was helpful to be able to describe those visions. i said the president's vision is trickle-down government and i don't think that's what america believes in. i see instead a prosperity that comes through freedom. >> repo
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: in just a few hours, president barack obama and former massachusetts governor mitt romney will take the stage at the university of denver's magness arena for the first of three election debates. tonight's encounter, moderated by the "newshour's" own jim lehrer, is to focus on domestic policy. the first half of the 90-minute face-off will be spent on the number one issue for most voters this year: the economy. joining us for the debate, and here with us now to preview what to expect tonight are two familiar faces syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. gentlemen, welcome. the night is finally here. mark, no pressure, just 60 million people will be watching. what are you looking for from tonighta encounter? >> what i'm looking for, judy, is that the-- the candidate who understands
. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. join me next time for a conversation with former fdic chair sheila bair. we'll talk about our efforts to regulate wall street. that is next time. we will see you then. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> be more.
pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome jeffrey sachs back to this program. he is one of the most important voices in our time. the director of the earth institute at columbia. his latest book is called "the price of civilization." he joins us tonight from new york. jeffrey sachs, good to have you back on this program. >> good to be back on. tavis: what has happened in this country since you wrote this book that made to put some new stuff in it for the paperback version? >> this book was about things really going wrong in america. the lack of civic virtue among the rich and powerful that we have expected and that we need. after i put the pen down in a writing the original book, the occupy movement brought attention finally around this country to huge inequalities. we have a campaign between a republican party that has a double down on greed and fear -- for the super-rich versus president obama of who is trying to steer a middle course. i like to see him steer a little bit more, frankly, even progressive to the progressive side, but compared to where romney i
, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. the first debate is behind us and the presidential race is tighter than ever. for different reasons, both candidates returned to the campaign trail this week with renewed vigor. >> you may know that a couple of nights ago we had a debate. you may have got an chance to see that. i got the chance to ask the president some questions i think people across the country have wanted to ask the president. which is why it was that when america needed jobs to badly he was pushing for obama care. >> my opponent has been trying to do a two-step and reposition and -- got an extreme makeover. governor romney plans to let wall street run wild again but he's going to bring down the hammer on "sesame street." it makes perfect sense. gwen: the morning the president got good news on the jobs front as the unemployment rate dropped if 8 .1 to 7 .8%. news so good that some romney supportsers even suggested the numbers must be cooke
that at all. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: creating new enriching experiences. through intel's philosophy of "invest you for the future" we're helping bring these new capabilities to market. we're investing billions of dollars in r&d around the globe to have the heart of tomorrow's innovations. by investing today in technologicalled advances here at intel, we can help make a better tomorrow. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the national debate over voter identification laws took a new turn in pennsylvania today. a state judge ruled that officials must wait until 2013 to begin enforcing a new law. ray suarez has the story. >> suarez: the decision means pennsylvania voters wi
. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. over the past week, peopling at the u.n. publicly weighed in the debate about what to do about the syrian conflict. today it was syria's turn to respond. president assad was unsurprisingly absent from the podium. instead, the talking was left to the country's foreign minister. walid muallem accused those spork terrorism in his country and prostriding arms to his army. he said calling president assad to step down would be serious to the affairs. he met with the secretary general to show compassion to their own people. but just how far is all the rhetoric got us? i'm joined here in the studio by steve from the u.s. institute of peace. steve, thank you very much indeed for coming in. listening to muallem's speech, what sort of insight does it give us into the way the syrian regime is thinking right now? >> well, the foreign minister repeated almost verbatim what they called this uprising from the very beginning. they depicted it as driven by foreign elements, as a conspiracy against the syrian people, against the syrian nati
presidential candidates. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and are around the globe. iran's currency is in freefall tonight. it has fallen 10% in trading against the dollar today, having already lost 80% of its value since the beginning of the year. president mahmoud ahmadinejad has accused the west of using sanctions to wage economic war against the country. u.s. officials say that this reflects the success of the economic sanctions targeted on the the nuclear program. >> a frightening crisis for the people of iran, a collapsing currency. with money losing value all the time, food prices have soared. some shops have stopped trading. many worry about jobs, savings, and why the government cannot stop it. >> the prices of food, cheese, butter, milk and even fruit have witnessed an increase of 10% in the last two weeks. people are complaining about that. they are publicly complaining about this situation and they blame the situation on a ahmadinejad. >> today, he put the blame on western sanctions. >> it is very clear, iran is being pressurized. there are sanctions from the enemy tellin
up. decker packwood cause >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america to the problem. the turkish prime minister said today he had no intention of starting a war with syria. but the message is mixed and the tensions are high. the turkish parliament authorize military action against neighbor after syrian shells landed in the turkish town killing five civilians. >> lot this was not turkey's war, but the deaths of one family next to the syrian border have changed kuwait this country sees its neighbors conflicts. the government has called the strike from syria a final straw. left of the isn't family hoped. -- this is what is left of the family home. the families mother and children were sitting in the garden when the shell hit. >> we were eating and we heard the sound obama. the shrapnel fell, hit the wall and in the ground. we could have been killed. -- we heard the sound of the bomb. syria has apologized for the debts, but those of fear another accidental strike. >> we are scared to death. we don't know when another reporter is going to be fired. we are targets and we are really fri
available. join us at pbs.org. as we leave you vietnamese catholic drummers performing at this year's marion days festival in carthage, missouri. ♪ ♪ ci
in -- after a syrian mashel kills five people on the turkish side of the border. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. one stage, at two men coming tens of millions of viewers. barack obama and mitt romney are getting set to square off for a televised debate. -- one stage, two men, tens of millions of viewers. for the first time, we might finally hear details on just how they plan to do it. our north american added there is in denver for us tonight. >> when the candidate stake to the stage tonight, they will want to convince the people that they speak their language. sometimes it is more of a stretch. >> [speaking spanish] >> obviously, they will not be speaking spanish tonight. the largest growing ethnic group could be critical in this election. there is going to be even more importance in the future. quarter of all americans under 18 are latino. canvassing in colorado, a swing state where the latino vote is hugely important. now, some are disappointed that he has not done more to help the illegal immigrants that come across the border. a few find this election a hard
the public cares about it. it works. who talks about it? >> we are talking about it. >> pbs section of the show -- give me a break. >> now you are insulting the audience. >> the 9 people in america who care about this stuff. what about the others? >> i bet they want to kill the people who did this. >> it took us quite a while to figure out exactly what happened, and we still may not know everything, in 9/11. with the guy said train, the intelligence had fallen apart. it took us long to realize it with these people were -- who these people were. >> "deception," the word that charles used. >> charles has a conspiracy. if it is a conspiracy, it is a pretty lousy one, being contradicted within hours. the ar drums from think tank commandos and the gucci guerrillas who dominate this city. it reminds me of norman schwarzkopf, who led troops to a successful venture, the triumph in the persian gulf war. he was getting all this praise from his fawning flatterers, and he said no, it does not take courage to order men into battle. it takes courage to go into battle. --t we're talking about >> n
the big screen, we look back at the man and his martinis. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. after months of gloomy financial news, tonight, some encouraging signs that america's economy is gaining momentum and creating more jobs. figures out today show unemployment has dropped to its lowest rate in almost four years. 12 million americans are still out of work, but falling unemployment has surprised most analysts. both barack obama and mitt romney were quick to seize on the numbers. here is our north america editor. >> snow in downtown denver slow down the rush hour, that millions of americans have no need form morning haste -- no need for morning haze. how to create more jobs has been central for this election. unemployment rose after barack obama became president, peaking at just over 10%. today's figure is the first time it has been under 8% for 44 months. >> this morning, we found out that the unemployment rate has fallen to its lowest level since i took office. [applause] >> the good news comes at the end of a bad week for the president where h
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> the following is a pbs election event. funding for this program was provided by: >> ifill: good evening, and welcome to special pbs "newshour" coverage of the first presidential debate between president barack obama and former governor mitt romney. i'm again ifil. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. tonight's debate will be moderated by our own jim leerer and will start a little over a minute from now, from the magness arena. >> after the debate we'll talked to arrow shapiro and scott horsily in denver, and christina bellantony. >> woodruff: you can follow along online on our live stream and live plog. two very quick thoughts from mark and david. mark, it come downs to this. >> in a rare race it's become increasingly a referendum on the challenger rather than the incumbent. can the challenger mitt romney make this a referendum on the president. >> who has the toughest job? >> romney. maybe jim lehrer. format i love. much more demanding on jim but better for us. >> ifill: we're looking forward to what jim has to say tonigh
to use the synapse to pop out and sitting here talking you and ji jim lehr about the pbs funding which is okay and cute and fun to talk about, how about the auto industry, i rescued it and you would let it go bankrupt. >> i am if for equal pay of women, he didn't bring up things and let romney get by with some really distracting and really unclear, in fact, untrue statements about healthcare where he said i am for coverage for preexisting conditions, his people later on said he wasn't and he said, in fact, before that he never was really for covering preexisting conditions unless, you know, it is paid for, ahead of time during, you know, continuing coverage, and a couple of times in the last week he said things like well if you get sick we won't let you die in your apartment and get you to er and yet came on last night talking about a national health plan he had which he really doesn't have. i thought he got away with a lot of things showing sympathy for social security recipients when in the tape recently exposed it was clear he had no sympathy for people he sees as parasites so i jus
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)